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Posts Tagged ‘malware’

Latest Security Intelligence Report Shows 24 Percent of PCs are Unprotected

Interesting and scary facts from Microsoft… why not just add a simple cloud based solution like Webroot to your PC’s and Mac’s? Read more about Webroot that I think is a great product here from one of my earlier posts: 1st Test of Webroot SecureAnywhere – #Webroot, #SecureAnywhere, #BYOD

Today, Microsoft released new research as part of its Security Intelligence Report, volume 14, which takes a close look at the importance of running up-to-date antivirus software on your computer. The research showed that, on average, computers without antivirus software are 5.5 times more likely to be infected.

Antivirus software from Microsoft, McAfee, Symantec and others helps to guard against viruses, remove infections and protect your privacy. It can help protect your computer from malware trying to steal your credit card information, e-mail address book or even the files you’ve saved to your computer. It is one of the most crucial defenses computer users have to help protect against cybercriminals.

If you have been using computers as long as I have, long before almost every device was constantly connected to the Internet, you’ll recall the days when viruses were typically spread via sneaker-net, through infected floppy disks. Read more…

Report: Android malware doubled in 2012, infecting 33M devices

Malware attacks on devices running Google’s (NASDAQ:GOOG) open-source Android mobile operating system more than doubled in 2012, security solutions firm NQ Mobile reports.

NQ Mobile - Malware by Year
NQ Mobile saw a year-over-year increase of malware of 163 percent.

NQ Mobile discovered 65,227 new pieces of mobile malware in 2012 compared to 24,794 in 2011, a year-over-year increase of 163 percent. Among all new malware discovered last year, 94.8 percent of threats were designed to attack Android, compared to just 4 percent targeting rival open-source platform Symbian. In all, more than 32.8 million Android devices were infected in 2012, up from 10.8 million in 2011, representing an increase of more than 200 percent.

Chinese devices accounted for 25.5 percent of infected Android devices, followed by India (19.4 percent), Russia (17.9 percent), the United States (9.8 percent) and Saudi Arabia (9.6 percent). Fifty-three percent of U.S. Android owners have installed a mobile security app on their device, NQ Mobile adds.

Sixty-five percent of mobile malware discovered in 2012 falls into the category of Potentially Unwanted Programs–e.g., root exploits, spyware, pervasive adware and Trojans (surveillance hacks). Twenty-eight percent was designed to collect and profit from a user’s personal data, and 7 percent was built to prevent the user’s device from functioning properly.

The primary methods for delivering malware in 2012 included App Repackaging (adding lines of malicious code into a legitimate app and reloading it onto a third-party marketplace), Smishing (asking consumers to click on a fraudulent link, triggering a malicious app download or directing their browser to a rogue website) and Malicious URLs (redirecting the browser from genuine websites to clone sites intended to collect personal data).

Critics maintain Google has failed to sufficiently police its Google Play digital storefront, making it easy for attackers to distribute malware via Android applications. Google has made strides to reduce Android threats, however: In early 2012, it unveiled Bouncer, which scans Google Play for malicious apps, and its Android 4.2 OS update, a.k.a. Jelly Bean, bakes in application verification tools.

The NQ Mobile report…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

Surprising Stats About Mobile Security

February 28, 2013 Leave a comment

Another good article!!

Surprising Stats About Mobile Security

IT security and data protection are the top ranked challenges faced by many mobile IT asset managers. This was certainly brought to light in Mobile Enterprise’s IT headaches executive survey, and recent research from the International Association of IT Asset Managers (IAITAM) brings this to light as well.

When IAITAM asked: how do organizations handle mobility and security? Fifty five percent of respondents access the enterprise from a remote location during off hours and the same number can access enterprise information from any BYOD device. Yet only 60% of organizations track how, how long or who is accessing remotely.
Out of those employees who do access the enterprise remotely, slightly more than half use a secure key or digital pass, while 49% use a login name and password on a secure site. A little more than half (53%) of organizations surveyed have an intrusion protection system for deployed mobile units.

Lost/Stolen Devices Covered
Nearly 90% of respondents have a mobile device policy and process in place for lost, misplaced or stolen mobile devices. At the same time, little more than a quarter have real-time location system tracking on any/all mobile devices. Still, 56% say they are able to perform a remote wipe of all data.
Less than half (43%) will automatically replace a lost, misplaced or stolen device within a 24 to 48 hour period. Eighty-four percent of companies have a firm policy that employees leaving the company must surrender their mobile device(s).
Tracking software downloaded on devices and preventing software downloads came in third and fourth as the most challenging issues, respectively, but with the predicted growth of mobile malware, this number could change going forward.

Asset Tracking?
Nearly 60% believe that they are managing mobile security adequately, but nearly 75% surveyed felt that licensing and management of mobile device assets is a challenge; 52% track their assets using an automated tool, while 36% still use spreadsheets. Another 12% are not tracking mobile assets at all. Members of the Mobile Enterprise Editorial Advisory recently had few things to say about this topic.
The main software programs accessed through a mobile handheld device or smartphone are Microsoft (85%), Google (52%) and Adobe (26%). Many of these same software publishers aggressively protect their intellectual property through software audits.

BYOD
Fifty-one percent of organizations surveyed had a BYOD or BYOT [technology] program that allows employees to use their personal mobile devices for work purposes. Surprisingly, 60% who took advantage of a BYOD program only accounted for 25% or less of employees who brought in their personal devices. 
 
More than three-quarters (77%) allow their employees…
Continue reading here!
//Richard

#Microsoft and Others Fail Antivirus Test – #ForeFront, #FEP, #AV

January 22, 2013 Leave a comment

Microsoft is still behind the competition…

How many of you out there are using ForeFront Endpoint Protection (FEP) to secure your clients/servers?

Below is a good article from Neil J. Rubenking about the latest (Nov/DEc 2012) report from AV-Test:

AV-Test.org

Based in Magdeburg, Germany, independent lab AV-Test evaluates and rates antivirus products on a variety of different criteria. Every couple of months the researchers summarize their testing and report on which products achieved certification. In the latest such report, several vendors failed to make the grade.

One of the many individual tests involved in AV-Test certification measures how well products stand up to zero-day attacks—viruses or other threats so new that no antivirus signature exists. AV-Test CEO Andreas Marx noted that the 25 consumer products in the current test averaged 92 percent detection of zero-day attacks. “This means,” said Marx “that one out of ten malware attacks succeeded.” He also pointed out that while the products averaged 91 percent cleanup of existing infections, many didn’t remove all traces. “Only 60% could be put back in a condition similar to the pre-infection state,” Marx observed.

Certification Failed
Products can earn six points each for repair of existing malware infestations, protection against new attacks, and overall usability. Here usability means the product doesn’t slow system performance and doesn’t falsely report valid programs or activities as malicious. In order to receive certification, a product must earn a total of 11 points.

Just as in the previous testMicrosoft didn’t make the cut, though with ten points it came close. PC Tools also failed with ten points.

The big loser this time around was AhnLab. In the previous test AhnLab squeaked by with 11 points. The latest test saw that score drop to 8.5 points, well below the certification cutof…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

Magic Quadrant for Endpoint Protection Platforms – #Gartner, #EPP via @rspruijt

January 14, 2013 1 comment

Magic Quadrant for Endpoint Protection Platforms

 
2 January 2013 ID:G00239869
Analyst(s): Peter Firstbrook, John Girard, Neil MacDonald

VIEW SUMMARY

The endpoint protection platform provides a collection of security utilities to protect PCs and tablets. Vendors in this market compete on the quality of their protection capabilities, the depth and breadth of features, and the ease of administration.

Market Definition/Description

The enterprise endpoint protection platform (EPP) market is a composite market primarily made up of collections of products. These include:

  • Anti-malware
  • Anti-spyware
  • Personal firewalls
  • Host-based intrusion prevention
  • Port and device control
  • Full-disk and file encryption, also known as mobile data protection
  • Endpoint data loss prevention (DLP)
  • Vulnerability assessment
  • Application control (see Note 1)
  • Mobile device management (MDM)

These products and features are typically centrally managed and ideally integrated by shared policies.

DLP, MDM and vulnerability assessment are also evaluated in their own Magic Quadrant or MarketScope analyses. Longer term, portions of these markets will get subsumed by the EPP market, as the personal firewall, host intrusion prevention, device control and anti-spyware markets have in the past. EPP suites are a logical place for convergence of these functions. Indeed, 53% of organizations in a recent Gartner survey1 already use a single vendor for several of these functions, or are actively consolidating products. In particular, mobile data protection is the leading complement to EPP and purchasing decisions regarding the two products are increasingly made together. For most organizations, selecting a mobile data protection system from their incumbent EPP vendors will meet their requirements.

In 2012, the large enterprise EPP market is still dominated by Symantec, McAfee and Trend Micro, which together represent approximately 68% of the total revenue of Magic Quadrant participants. Sophos and Kaspersky Lab are the two other global leaders that are competitive across multiple functions and geographies, and push the combined Leaders quadrant market share to 85%. Despite the introduction of new players, the displacement of incumbents is still a significant challenge in the large enterprise market. The biggest impact of the Magic Quadrant Challengers and Visionaries is to push the dominant market players to invest in new features and functionality (sometimes via acquisitions) to stay ahead, and to keep pricing rational. In the less demanding small and midsize market, competition is more intense. A number of Niche Player solutions are dominant in specific regions.

The total EPP revenue of the Magic Quadrant participants at year-end 2011 was roughly $2.8 billion, up 4% from 2010. We attribute this growth primarily to increased buying of more-expensive suites, offset by lower prices for low-end malware-only solutions. Consequently, EPP revenue growth is more a result of an inflow of revenue from other markets. We anticipate that growth will continue to be in the low single digits in 2013.

Microsoft is the best vendor in a position to challenge the incumbent Leaders, primarily due to attractive pricing in its enterprise agreements. Approximately one-third of enterprise buyers1 indicate they are actively considering Microsoft or plan to do so during their next renewal periods. However, Microsoft’s slow development, the lack of a single unified security management interface and mediocre test results will temper its adoption. Longer term, we believe that increased displacement of Windows endpoints with application-controlled OSs (such as Microsoft WinRT and Apple’s iOS and OS X Mountain Lion) is the biggest market threat. These solutions shift the value proposition of EPP solutions from traditional anti-malware to MDM and data protection capabilities.

Magic Quadrant

Figure 1. Magic Quadrant for Endpoint Protection Platforms
Figure 1.Magic Quadrant for Endpoint Protection Platforms

 
 

Source: Gartner (January 2013)

Vendor Strengths and Cautions

Arkoon Network Security

Arkoon Network Security’s StormShield EPP solution (formerly offered by SkyRecon Systems) is designed as a seamless integrated EPP with a focus on behavioral protection. Arkoon’s Ability to Execute score is hampered by its relatively small market share and limited geographic presence, as well as its still-maturing management capabilities….

Continue reading here!

//Richard

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