Archive for the ‘Linux’ Category

#Citrix Linux Virtual Desktop 1.1 released! – #Linux, #DaaS, #EnvokeIT, #XenDesktop

October 13, 2015 Leave a comment

Citrix has now released version 1.1 of the Linux VDA as a part of XenDesktop 7.6 Feature Pack 3! 🙂

These are the new features of tis release:

  • Linux VDI dedicated desktops enabled in XenApp, XenDesktop 7.6 infrastructure
  • Multi-monitor support with Linux virtual desktop at maximum total resolution of 8192×8192
  • Support for RHEL 7 and SLE 12.
  • Addition of Centrify for domain join along with existing Winbind and Quest support
  • KDE window manager and enabling QT based applications support on Linux Virtual Desktop
  • Internationalization support for non-English environments

Click here to download!

For more information the please see my previous blog post on this great Linux Hosted Desktop Experience!



Highly critical “Ghost” allowing code execution affects most Linux systems – #Vulnerability, #Security, #Linux

January 29, 2015 Leave a comment

And here it continues, another critical vulnerability that affects most Linux systems. Ensure that your system is updated and rebooted!!

More information about Citrix affected systems can be found here:

Citrix Security Advisory for glibc GHOST Vulnerability (CVE-2015-0235)

Here is a great article on the vulnerability itself from

An extremely critical vulnerability affecting most Linux distributions gives attackers the ability to execute malicious code on servers used to deliver e-mail, host webpages, and carry out other vital functions.

The vulnerability in the GNU C Library (glibc) represents a major Internet threat, in some ways comparable to the Heartbleed and Shellshock bugs that came to light last year. The bug, which is being dubbed “Ghost” by some researchers, has the common vulnerability and exposures designation of CVE-2015-0235. While a patch was issued two years ago, most Linux versions used in production systems remain unprotected at the moment. What’s more, patching systems requires core functions or the entire affected server to be rebooted, a requirement that may cause some systems to remain vulnerable for some time to come.

The buffer overflow flaw resides in __nss_hostname_digits_dots(), a glibc function that’s invoked by the gethostbyname() and gethostbyname2() function calls. A remote attacker able to call either of these functions could exploit the flaw to execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the user running the application. In a blog post published Tuesday, researchers from security firm Qualys said they were able to write proof-of-concept exploit code that carried out a full-fledged remote code execution attack against the Exim mail server. The exploit bypassed all existing exploit protections available on both 32-bit and 64-bit systems, including address space layout randomization, position independent executions, and no execute protections. Qualys has not yet published the exploit code but eventually plans to make it available as a Metasploit module.

“A lot of collateral damage on the Internet”

The glibc is the most common code library used by Linux. It contains standard functions that programs written in the C and C++ languages use to carry out common tasks. The vulnerability also affects Linux programs written in Python, Ruby, and most other languages because they also rely on glibc. As a result, most Linux systems should be presumed vulnerable unless they run an alternative to glibc or use a glibc version that contains the update from two years ago. The specter of so many systems being susceptible to an exploit with such severe consequences is prompting concern among many security professionals. Read more…

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