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Posts Tagged ‘criteria’

POC vs. Pilot vs. Production via #Citrix blogs

January 26, 2013 Leave a comment

A good summary here from Scott Campbell! And I see many cases where steps are forgotten, scope’ing being totally off and customer getting unhappy in the end…

To successfully deploy a Citrix solution, it’s important to be aware of how users are interacting with the environment, understand the purpose of the environment, and plan how the environment fits into the support structure. In the course of my 8+ years with Citrix I have seen countless customer environments, and being aware of the items above can make or break your deployment. At a basic level it comes down to understanding the difference between a Proof of Concept, Pilot and Production. There tends to be a few unique commonalities across all POCs, all Pilots and all Production deployments that made them successful.

Additionally, I’ll discuss a hybrid approach that uses a simplified and streamlined approach to accelerate a virtualization project to get a medium sized user population on-boarded.

This article is by no means meant to be exhaustive, but is instead to provide some food for thought to get you in the right mindset and on the right path when planning your virtualization project.

 

POC – Proof of Concept

It probably sounds intuitive, but the point of a POC is to prove the feasibility of a solution, or the feasibility of a critical aspect of a solution. Typically a POC is trying to answer questions similar to the ones below:

  • Will this technology meet our needs?
  • Will this product perform as advertised?
  • Will the prospective end user communities be productive with the new way of doing things?
  • Will the ultimate solution be feasible?

What does a POC look like? In order for a POC to be successful, it must be broken up into the following steps:

  1. Definition of success criteria.Clearly and specifically defining success criteria will set you up for success. Appropriate success criteria typically come from business decision makers, IT, end-users, or end-user representatives. Obtaining success criteria from the internet or solution vendors typically presents a skewed point of view and probably won’t accurately address what is important to your situation.There are two..

Continue reading here!

//Richard

 

#Microsoft and Others Fail Antivirus Test – #ForeFront, #FEP, #AV

January 22, 2013 Leave a comment

Microsoft is still behind the competition…

How many of you out there are using ForeFront Endpoint Protection (FEP) to secure your clients/servers?

Below is a good article from Neil J. Rubenking about the latest (Nov/DEc 2012) report from AV-Test:

AV-Test.org

Based in Magdeburg, Germany, independent lab AV-Test evaluates and rates antivirus products on a variety of different criteria. Every couple of months the researchers summarize their testing and report on which products achieved certification. In the latest such report, several vendors failed to make the grade.

One of the many individual tests involved in AV-Test certification measures how well products stand up to zero-day attacks—viruses or other threats so new that no antivirus signature exists. AV-Test CEO Andreas Marx noted that the 25 consumer products in the current test averaged 92 percent detection of zero-day attacks. “This means,” said Marx “that one out of ten malware attacks succeeded.” He also pointed out that while the products averaged 91 percent cleanup of existing infections, many didn’t remove all traces. “Only 60% could be put back in a condition similar to the pre-infection state,” Marx observed.

Certification Failed
Products can earn six points each for repair of existing malware infestations, protection against new attacks, and overall usability. Here usability means the product doesn’t slow system performance and doesn’t falsely report valid programs or activities as malicious. In order to receive certification, a product must earn a total of 11 points.

Just as in the previous testMicrosoft didn’t make the cut, though with ten points it came close. PC Tools also failed with ten points.

The big loser this time around was AhnLab. In the previous test AhnLab squeaked by with 11 points. The latest test saw that score drop to 8.5 points, well below the certification cutof…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

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