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Posts Tagged ‘Project’

Citrix Project Accelerator updated – #XenDesktop

October 28, 2013 Leave a comment

“Customize My Design”,  the Design release of Project Accelerator is here! We listened to your feedback and have delivered the ability to change FlexCast, application delivery, profiles and over 30 other decisions for your XenDesktop architecture. Across these decisions you will now be able to:

  • Tailor your design to fit organizational and end user needs
  • Visualize how your design “tweaks” affect hardware sizing and architecture
  • On-the-fly comparison of Citrix Recommendations to your design decisions
  • Review “Architect Comments”, guidance from the Citrix experts for each Decision

“Customize my Design” is the next step for Project Accelerator; the application that simplifies getting your XenDesktop, XenApp, or XenClient deployment done successfully the first time. It’s the Citrix environment where customers, partners, and Citrites can design a desktop virtualization project that more closely suits their business priorities, end user needs, and organizational preferences. And it is back-stopped by the real-world experience of Citrix Consulting, so you can use the results in your project.

 Check it out right now or read more about what Project Accelerator can do for you here. Then tell us what you like, and let us…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

Designing a virtual desktop environment? – #XenDesktop, #Citrix

This is a good blog post by Niraj Patel.

Questions: How do you successfully design a virtual desktop solution for 1,000 users?  How about 10,000 users?  What about 50,000 users?  What are the questions you should be asking?  Most importantly, where do you start?

Answer: Hire Citrix Consulting for your next virtual desktop project!  OK, that is one right answer, but not the only way to do it.  The successful way to design a virtual desktop environment is to follow a modular approach using the 5 layers defined within the Citrix Virtual Desktop Handbook.  Breaking apart a virtual desktop project into different layers provides a modular approach that reduces risks and increase chances for your project’s success no matter how larger you’re planned deployment is.  What are the 5 layers and some examples of the decisions are defined within them?

  1. User Layer:  Recommended end-points and the required user functionality.
  2. Access Layer:  How the user will connect to their desktop hosted in the desktop layer.  Decisions for local vs. remote access, firewalls and SSL-VPN communications are addressed within this layer.
  3. Desktop Layer:  The desktop layer contains the user’s virtual desktop and is subdivided into three components; image, applications, and personalization.  Decisions related to FlexCast model, application requirements, policy, and profile design are addressed in this layer.
  4. Control Layer:  Within the control layer decisions surrounding the management and maintenance of the overall solution are addressed.  The control layer is comprised of access controllers, desktop controllers and infrastructure controllers.  Access controllers support the access layer, desktop controllers support the desktop layer, and infrastructure controllers provide the underlying support for each component within the architecture.
  5. Hardware Layer:  The hardware layer contains the physical devices required to support the entire solution, and includes servers, processors, memory and storage devices.

Want to know how to get started?  Try the Citrix Project Accelerator.  Input criteria around your business requirements, technical expertise, end user requirements, applications, etc. to get started on your architecture based on the 5 layer model.

Lastly, don’t forget to come see SYN318…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

#Citrix transfers #Xen to the #Linux Foundation – via @scottjcutter

In 2007 Citrix acquired XenSource gaining control over the development of the Xen Hypervisor part of the Xen project. Today Citrix announcedthat it will hand over the Xen Project to the Linux Foundation which will continue its development. After both Ian Pratt and Simon Crosby who came from XenSource left Citrix to start their company Bromium, Citrix has clearly been struggling on how to continue its involvement in the development of the Xen project, leading to this decision.

The following companies will contribute to and guide the Xen Project as founding members of the Collaborative Project at The Linux Foundation: Amazon Web Services, AMD, Bromium, Calxeda, CA Technologies, Cisco, Citrix, Google, Intel, Oracle, Samsung and Verizon.

Its interesting to note that the Linux Foundation also supports the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) development, the hypervisor included in…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

POC vs. Pilot vs. Production via #Citrix blogs

January 26, 2013 Leave a comment

A good summary here from Scott Campbell! And I see many cases where steps are forgotten, scope’ing being totally off and customer getting unhappy in the end…

To successfully deploy a Citrix solution, it’s important to be aware of how users are interacting with the environment, understand the purpose of the environment, and plan how the environment fits into the support structure. In the course of my 8+ years with Citrix I have seen countless customer environments, and being aware of the items above can make or break your deployment. At a basic level it comes down to understanding the difference between a Proof of Concept, Pilot and Production. There tends to be a few unique commonalities across all POCs, all Pilots and all Production deployments that made them successful.

Additionally, I’ll discuss a hybrid approach that uses a simplified and streamlined approach to accelerate a virtualization project to get a medium sized user population on-boarded.

This article is by no means meant to be exhaustive, but is instead to provide some food for thought to get you in the right mindset and on the right path when planning your virtualization project.

 

POC – Proof of Concept

It probably sounds intuitive, but the point of a POC is to prove the feasibility of a solution, or the feasibility of a critical aspect of a solution. Typically a POC is trying to answer questions similar to the ones below:

  • Will this technology meet our needs?
  • Will this product perform as advertised?
  • Will the prospective end user communities be productive with the new way of doing things?
  • Will the ultimate solution be feasible?

What does a POC look like? In order for a POC to be successful, it must be broken up into the following steps:

  1. Definition of success criteria.Clearly and specifically defining success criteria will set you up for success. Appropriate success criteria typically come from business decision makers, IT, end-users, or end-user representatives. Obtaining success criteria from the internet or solution vendors typically presents a skewed point of view and probably won’t accurately address what is important to your situation.There are two..

Continue reading here!

//Richard

 

New #Citrix #Visio Stencils – via @djfeller – #XenApp #XenDesktop #XenClient #XenServer

January 23, 2013 Leave a comment

Thanks a lot for the great work you did on Project Accelerator, and for sharing the Visio stencils!! 🙂

By spending a little time in the Assess phase, Project Accelerator creates this awesome looking diagram

Arch

The truth is, this diagram took many, many, many revisions. We wanted to create something that was easy to follow while providing the most important information people wanted to see, which included IOPS, servers, VMs, storage space, desktop images, infrastructure components, and so much more. It took a few revisions before I had something in Visio that did all of that. Then we gave my diagram to Marta Guerra, a senior designer on the Project Accelerator team. She turned the diagram into something easy to follow and very clean with new images/icons for all of the components. I’m still impressed. I know many of you are too because you’ve asked for the Visio stencils.

Unfortunately, Project Accelerator diagrams aren’t done in Visio, but that didn’t stop us from giving you what you wanted. With the help of Marta, I’ve been able to turn these images into a new set of Citrix Visio Stencils.

Get them here

//Richard

 

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