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Posts Tagged ‘how’

Configuring #XenMobile Device Manager HA Clustering – #MDM, #Citrix

March 7, 2014 1 comment

A couple of nice videos from Albert Alvarez  here about how to cluster XenMobile device manager!

In my previous post we configured clustered Node 1.  In this second Part we will complete the cluster configuration in Node 2  and will validate and test the configuration..

//Richard

How to check which #NetScaler policy that your #Citrix #Receiver or web browser hits?

April 18, 2013 1 comment

Ok, this is a common issue that you’ll end up in when setting up Access Gateway access scenarios:

How do you know which policy that is hit when your different Receivers are logging in?

Well, there are a couple of nice commands that can help you troubleshooting your access scenario! I guess that most of you have a simple scenario where you have one domain to authenticate against and some simple PNA, CVPN and potentially SSL VPN policies and profiles to deal with, and they are all linked to the virtual server like something like this simple example:

AG_vServer_VIP

But in more complex scenarios you may end up controlling which browser the user is accessing with (for giving nice error messages instead of Citrix default messages when users may use an unsupported browser etc.), or when you have multiple AD domains and AD groups to link different policies to etc. Then it may be complex and you have multiple policies and profiles for the same config with minor changes like the SSO domain name etc. So how do you then troubleshoot that easily?

First we have the must know command that hooks into the auth process of the NetScaler and gives you a view of the authentication process:

cat /tmp/aaad.debug

When you run that and you authenticate you’ll see the result of your auth process agains for instance LDAP and RADIUS sources like the result here when I logged in to our little environment:

aaad_debug_output

At the top of the output you see all the AD groups that I’m a member of that needs to match the group that you like to use on the NetScaler side, and last you see that accept from AD for my authentication request.

Then you know that you’re authentication ok, but which of the session polices are we hitting? Then you need to have a look at this great command:

nsconmsg -d current -g pol_hits

This is the output when I access using my Receiver on OS X:

nsconmsg_policy_hit

Read more…

Designing a virtual desktop environment? – #XenDesktop, #Citrix

This is a good blog post by Niraj Patel.

Questions: How do you successfully design a virtual desktop solution for 1,000 users?  How about 10,000 users?  What about 50,000 users?  What are the questions you should be asking?  Most importantly, where do you start?

Answer: Hire Citrix Consulting for your next virtual desktop project!  OK, that is one right answer, but not the only way to do it.  The successful way to design a virtual desktop environment is to follow a modular approach using the 5 layers defined within the Citrix Virtual Desktop Handbook.  Breaking apart a virtual desktop project into different layers provides a modular approach that reduces risks and increase chances for your project’s success no matter how larger you’re planned deployment is.  What are the 5 layers and some examples of the decisions are defined within them?

  1. User Layer:  Recommended end-points and the required user functionality.
  2. Access Layer:  How the user will connect to their desktop hosted in the desktop layer.  Decisions for local vs. remote access, firewalls and SSL-VPN communications are addressed within this layer.
  3. Desktop Layer:  The desktop layer contains the user’s virtual desktop and is subdivided into three components; image, applications, and personalization.  Decisions related to FlexCast model, application requirements, policy, and profile design are addressed in this layer.
  4. Control Layer:  Within the control layer decisions surrounding the management and maintenance of the overall solution are addressed.  The control layer is comprised of access controllers, desktop controllers and infrastructure controllers.  Access controllers support the access layer, desktop controllers support the desktop layer, and infrastructure controllers provide the underlying support for each component within the architecture.
  5. Hardware Layer:  The hardware layer contains the physical devices required to support the entire solution, and includes servers, processors, memory and storage devices.

Want to know how to get started?  Try the Citrix Project Accelerator.  Input criteria around your business requirements, technical expertise, end user requirements, applications, etc. to get started on your architecture based on the 5 layer model.

Lastly, don’t forget to come see SYN318…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

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