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Posts Tagged ‘Audio’

GotoMeeting Free – yes, free collaboration!! – #Citrix, #GotoMeeting

Well, I can’t count the number of times that I’ve heard people saying that they wished they had GotoMeeting licenses or a similar capability that is free… and what just happened!?! Citrix released a free version! 🙂

It of course has some limitations and lack of capabilities compared to the full service you get when being it, but if you can survive with using a Chrome browser to collaborate with you colleagues, friends and loved ones then this is a great service!

Citrix GoToMeeting Free

Mathieu Hofman, researcher and developer of GoToMeeting Free, and Eric Bensley, GoToMeeting Senior Product Manager, explain what motivated them to create the newest member of the GoToMeeting product line, GoToMeeting Free.

Hi, Mathieu and Eric here. We are really excited about the launch of GoToMeeting Free! This started simply as technology innovation and now has evolved into the latest addition to our award-winning communications solutions. GoToMeeting Free is an entirely free, browser-based (Chrome), unlimited-use video conferencing product for up to three people. And we made it simple: no need to log in, download additional software, or enable plug-ins.

When our teams first began working on this product it was not about adding to GoToMeeting but rather seeing what would happen if we took great technology – Chrome and WebRTC – and created something that would let people connect instantly in a face-to-face experience. In our efforts there were a few things we aimed to address:

  • Eliminate the need for downloads by running from a browser
  • Make getting into sessions fast and efficient – no sign up, no access codes, just click and go
  • Deliver a high quality video and audio experience
  • Available in Chrome Web store

The result: GoToMeeting Free is like the “casual coffee” of meetings by removing the barriers to quickly connecting with anyone in a meaningful way…

And here you have some other details from the GotoMeeting blog:

What You Need to Know about GoToMeeting Free

The cost of doing business these days can be daunting. And with the growth of small-business startups comes the need for low-cost and highly collaborative software solutions. Enter GoToMeeting Free.

What is GoToMeeting Free? It’s an entirely free addition to the Citrix collaboration suite that offers unlimited-use video conferencing for up to three people. And did we mention it’s completely browser-based in Google Chrome? Meaning no need to download any additional software.

Who can use GoToMeeting Free? Everyone. GoToMeeting Free was designed with lean startups and entrepreneurs in mind, but this software is open to anyone with Chrome, a webcam and a reliable Internet connection.

Why use GoToMeeting Free? If you are hosting small informal meetings for dispersed teams or your office doesn’t have the budget for a company-sponsored video conferencing account, then this is the solution. There’s no limit to the amount of meetings you can host, and it allows you to connect instantly with a face-to-face experience.

We wanted to build tool that was something that we would use ourselves, so here are a few of the areas we looked to address:

  • No pesky software downloads. Because GoToMeeting Free runs from a browser (Chrome), there’s no need to download additional software. Just send your attendees the link and join the meeting – it’s that easy.
  • Faster join times. Because there is no software to download, no sign-up required and no access codes needed, all you need to do is simply click to connect instantly.
  • High-quality video and audio experience. Using WebRTC technology we were able to create a product that would allow small audiences to connect seamlessly with no dial-in required.

We’ve gotten rave reviews so far on the simple and straight-forward experience of GoToMeeting Free. And we are in development for additional features that will allow teams an even higher lever of collaboration in the near future. We hope you’ll try it out.

Continue reading here and here!

//Richard

#Citrix #Receiver for Linux 13 released

November 13, 2013 Leave a comment

Finally Citrix has released a Receiver version for Linux that for instance has StoreFront support! Can’t wait to try it out and see if it gives the same user  experience etc like the one on OS X and Windows!

Here you have some details about it and links to the product documentation:

Access Windows applications and virtual desktops, as well as web and SaaS applications. Enable anywhere access from your Linux thin client/desktop or use web access.

What’s new

The following new features are available in this release:

  • Support for XenDesktop 7 features – Receiver supports many of the new features and enhancements in XenDesktop 7, including Windows Media client-side content fetching, HDX 3D Pro, HDX RealTime webcam compression, Server-rendered Rich Graphics, and IPv6 support.
    Note: Link-local network addresses are not supported in IPv6 environments. You must have at least one global or unique-local address assigned to your network interface.
  • VDI-in-a-Box support – You can use Receiver to connect to virtual desktops created with Citrix VDI-in-a-Box.
  • Self-service UI – A new graphical user interface (UI), like that in other Citrix Receivers, replaces the configuration manager, wfcmgr. After they are set up with an account, users can subscribe to desktops and applications, and then start them.
  • Deprecated and removed utilities – The pnabrowse command-line utility is deprecated in favor of the new storebrowse command-line utility. The icabrowse and wfcmgr utilities have been removed.
  • StoreFront support – You can now connect to StoreFront stores as well as Citrix XenApp sites (also known as Program Neighborhood Agent sites).
  • UDP audio support – Most audio features are transported using the ICA stream and are secured in the same way as other ICA traffic. User Datagram Protocol (UDP) Audio uses a separate, unsecured, transport mechanism, but is more consistent when the network is busy. UDP Audio is primarily designed for Voice over IP (VoIP) connections and requires that audio traffic is of medium quality (that is Speex wideband) and unencrypted.
  • Packaging – An armhf (hard float) Debian package and tarball are now included in the download packages. In addition, the Debian package for Intel systems uses multiarch (a Debian feature) for installations on 32- and 64-bit systems. 32-bit binaries are also available in RPM packages.
  • System Flow Control – Video display has been enhanced on low-performance user devices that connect to high-performance servers. In such setups, System Flow Control prevents sessions becoming uncontrollable and unusable.
  • Localization – Receiver is now available in German, Spanish, French, Japanese, and Simplified Chinese.
  • Keyboard improvements – You can now specify which local key combination (Ctrl+Alt+End or Ctrl+Alt+Enter) generates the Ctrl+Alt+Delete combination on a remote Windows desktop. In addition, a new option supports Croatian keyboard layouts.
  • Deferred XSync – While one frame is still on screen, Receiver can now decode tiles for the next frame. This provides a performance improvement compared with previous releases, in which Receiver waited for a frame to finish being displayed before decoding the next frame.
  • Audio and webcam playback improvements – Various changes are implemented that conserve CPU cycles and reduce latency.
  • Audio settings – Several new audio settings are now available in module.ini.

For more product and release info read here!

//Richard

Lync 2013 client preview for VDI/Hosted Virtual Desktop environments

September 20, 2012 1 comment

This is an update in the right direction for getting all Lync features to work in a hosted environment! But where are we on this topic of getting the collaboration features etc. to our end-users in a good way to the “Any Device” and “Anywhere” or BYOD if that’s what you wanna call it?

Before there has been a lot of issues with running Lync and what’s supported feature-wise depending on where you ran Lync, what protocol you where accessing it over and how Lync was presented (either as published desktop or as a published app). And this had it’s challenges for companies that for instance wanted to go to a BYOD model where the end-point device the user was sitting on wsn’t managed and didn’t allowed Lync to be installed and where those users then were relying on their XenApp or XenDesktop environment. And then there are features that aren’t supported or let’s say; didn’t work that well and really loaded the host server.

The table below is from a great Microsoft blog post by Jesper Osgaard where he compares the features of Lync in a virtualized environment;

What did Citrix do about it? Well first they released the HDX Realtime Optimization Pack for Microsoft Lync to address these issues and to ensure improved Lync functionality. And I must give Citrix credit for adding support for Linux directly!

Read more…

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