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Posts Tagged ‘flash’

#Nutanix #Prism GUI Interactive Mock-Up Available – via @VirtuallyGeeky and @andreleibovici

February 3, 2014 1 comment

Wow, this is great!

Nutanix Sr. Systems Engineer, Tim Federwitz (@VirtuallyGeeky), created a nice interactive mock-up of the Nutanix Prism Administrative Interface.

PRISM_Dashboard

 
In Tim’s own words, “I have created a VERY simple, but somewhat functional, slightly interactive look at the Nutanix Prism GUI (the Nutanix Web Console). You can use it from pretty much any device, including mobile phones and tablets. Click or tap on the various items in the GUI to navigate around the different screen captures. The screenshots are all static, of course, but at least you get to see the different screens and features.

It is still in its infant stage as I threw it together in a few hours last Sunday night. I plan on finishing up the screens I didn’t have time for, but feel free to use it as it comes together. I am “releasing” it early as there seems to be a LOT of interest in something like this.

I really created it to easily show potential customers what the Web Console looks like and highlight some of the features and ease of use that it brings. Along with showing how VM centric and granular…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

#Nutanix Triumphs at V3 Technology Awards 2013 for Best Virtualisation Product – #IaaS

December 4, 2013 Leave a comment

This is great! A great product takes another award!!! 😉

V3 Readers Award Nutanix with Prestigious Industry Recognition in Highly Competitive Category

Nutanix also won the Best of VMworld 2013 Gold Award for Private Cloud Computing!

LONDON, December 3, 2013 – Nutanix, the leading provider of hyper-efficient, massively scalable and elegantly simple datacentre infrastructure solutions, has been awarded for its continuing innovation in optimising datacentre infrastructure at the V3 Technology Awards 2013. During a ceremony at the Waldorf Hilton Hotel, the company was awarded Best Virtualisation product, beating a host of well respected and larger, more established organisations in the virtualisation market.

V3.co.uk is a leading source of news and analysis for technology professionals, written by a team of expert IT journalists in the UK and Silicon Valley. The awards were hotly contested this year, with more than 450 entries from 150 companies.

“It’s great to see a new company like Nutanix being recognised at the V3 Technology Awards, among the industry giants. It wasn’t an easy task whittling down the hundreds of entries to create the shortlist, and then V3 readers voted in their thousands for their favourites, making this a significant achievement and a well-deserved win. Well done Nutanix!” said Madeline Bennett, Editor, V3 and The INQUIRER.

Alan Campbell, Regional Director of Western Europe at Nutanix, commented on the success: “Nutanix is a company that is constantly innovating and striving to provide the best platform for its customers, so this recognition by a highly respected publication is a testament to the hard work of our team. Virtualisation is a rapidly evolving technology which we are proud to be at the forefront of and to receive an award in the UK, a key market for us, is an honour.

As the fastest growing enterprise…

Continue reading here!

//Richard

Under the Covers of a Distributed Virtual Computing Platform – Built For Scale and Agility – via @dlink7, #Nutanix

November 21, 2013 Leave a comment

I must say that Dwayne did a great job with this blog post series!! It goes into expelling the Nutanix Distributed File System (NDFS) that I must say is the most amazing enterprise product out there if you need a truly scalable and agile Compute and Storage platform! I advise you to read this series!!

Under the Covers of a Distributed Virtual Computing Platform – Part 1: Built For Scale and Agility

Lots of talk in the industry about how had software defined storage first and who was using what components. I don’t want to go down that rat hole since it’s all marketing and it won’t help you at the end of the day to enable your business. I want to really get into the nitty gritty of the Nutanix Distributed Files System(NDFS). NDFS has been in production for over a year and half with good success, take read of the article on the Wall Street Journal.

Below are core services and components that make NDFS tick. There are actually over 13 services, for example our replication is distributed across all the nodes to provide speed and low impact on the system. The replication service is called Cerebro which we will get to in this series.
Nuntaix Distrubuted File System

 

This isn’t some home grown science experiment, the engineers that wrote the code come from Google, Facebook, Yahoo where this components where invented. It’s important to realize that all components are replaceable or future proofed if you will. The services\libraries provide the API’s so as newest innovations happen in the community, Nutanix is positioned to take advantage.

All the services mentioned above run on multiple nodes in cluster a master-less fashion to provide availability. The nodes talk over 10 GbE and are able to scale in a linear fashion. There is no performance degradation as you add nodes. Other vendors have to use InfiniBand because they don’t share the metadata cross all of the nodes. Those vendors end up putting a full copy of the metadata on each node, this eventually will cause them to hit a performance cliff and the scaling stops. Each Nutanix node acts a storage controller allowing you to do things like have a datastore of 10,000 VM’s without any performance impact… continue reading part 1 here

Under the Covers of a Distributed Virtual Computing Platform – Part 2: ZZ Top

In case you missed Part 1 – Part 1: Built For Scale and Agility
zz-top-03082012-19
No it’s not Billy Gibbons, Dusty Hill, or drummer Frank Beard. It’s Zeus and Zookeeper providing the strong blues that allow the Nutanix Distributed File System to maintain it’s configuration across the entire cluster. Read more…

There was a big flash, and then the dinosaurs died – via @binnygill, #Nutanix

November 15, 2013 Leave a comment

Great blog post by @binnygill! 😉

This is how it was supposed to end. The legacy SAN and NAS vendors finally realize that Flash is fundamentally different from HDDs. Even after a decade of efforts to completely assimilate Flash into the legacy architectures of the SAN/NAS era, it’s now clear that new architectures are required to support Flash arrays. The excitement around all-flash arrays is a testament to how different Flash is from HDDs, and its ultimate importance to datacenters.

Consider what happened in the datacenter two decades ago: HDDs were moved out of networked computers, and SAN and NAS were born. What is more interesting, however, is what was not relocated.

Although it was feasible to move DRAM out with technology similar to RDMA, it did not make sense. Why move a low latency, high throughput component across a networking fabric, which would inevitably become a bottleneck?

Today Flash is forcing datacenter architects to revisit this same decision. Fast near-DRAM-speed storage is a reality today. SAN and NAS vendors have attempted to provide that same goodness in the legacy architectures, but have failed. The last ditch effort is to create special-purpose architectures that bundle flash into arrays, and connect it to a bunch of servers. If that is really a good idea, then why don’t we also pool DRAM in that fashion and share with all servers? This last stand will be a very short lived one. What is becoming increasingly apparent is that Flash belongs on the server – just like DRAM.

For example, consider a single Fusion-IO flash card that writes at 2.5GB/s throughput and supports 1,100,000 IOPS with just 15 microsec latency (http://www.fusionio.com/products/iodrive2-duo/). You can realize these speeds by attaching the card to your server and throwing your workload at it. If you put 10 of these cards in a 2U-3U storage controller, should you expect 25GB/s streaming writes, and 11 million IOPS at sub millisecond latencies. To my knowledge no storage controller can do that today, and for good reasons.

Networked storage has the overhead of networking protocols. Protocols like NFS and iSCSI are not designed for massive parallelism, and end up creating bottlenecks that make crossing a few million IOPS on a single datastore an extremely hard computer science problem. Further, if an all-flash array is servicing ten servers, then the networking prowess of the all-flash array should be 10X of that of each server, or else we end up artificially limiting the bandwidth that each server can get based on how the storage array is shared.

No networking technology, whether it be Infiniband, Ethernet, or fibre channel can beat the price and performance of locally-attached PCIe, or even that of a locally-attached SATA controller. Placing flash devices that operate at almost DRAM speeds outside of the server requires unnecessary investment in high-end networking. Eventually, as flash becomes faster, the cost of a speed-matched network will become unbearable, and the datacenter will gravitate towards locally-attached flash – both for technological reasons, as well as for sustainable economics.

The right way to utilize flash is to treat it as one would treat DRAM — place it on the server where it belongs. The charts below illustrate the dramatic speed up from server-attached flash.

Continue reading here!

//Richard

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